Food Court survival

Written by admin on June 25, 2008 – 5:56 pm -

When we first arrived in Seoul in what seems like eons ago, we often had our meals at western restaurants. We didn’t have a choice at the time since only restaurants like TGI Fridays and Outback provided bilingual menus. This resulted in a very dramatic increase of our food expenditure compared to Singapore where we had previously lived.

This time around I put my back into learning how to read Korean so that I would be able to read the menus of Korean restaurants, something that I couldn’t be bothered with five years ago. I also conditioned myself not to crave for Western or Filipino meals and snacks.

Ordering at most food courts in South Korea is different from those in United States or the Philippines, though there are some places that are like what we are used to such as the COEX or the Technomart Food Court. You normally place your order at the cashier who handles everything for the entire food court. Behind the cashier is a board showing all the food stalls with their offerings, the caveat is that most food courts have their menu boards in Korean, so being able to read Korean will definitely come in handy at this stage. If you don’t read Korean most cashiers are usually kind enough to help you through the process especially if they are not that busy.

After your order is placed and punched in, the cashier hands you your receipt with a queue number on it, which is flashed on a screen when your order is ready to be picked up.

Food Court

If you’re with your friends or colleagues it would be a good idea to learn this phrase : 맛있게 드세요 – Maske Juseyo, which is the Korean equivalent of Bon Appetite.


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Posted in Seoul | 2 Comments »


2 Responses to “Food Court survival”

  1. By peter kim on Jun 25, 2008 | Reply

    ‘Masike Deseyo!’ You are really nice korean alredy man!

  2. By annabanana on Jun 27, 2008 | Reply

    I love the chaos in Filipino food courts, I love it when I smell like sizzling sisig when I step out, and I love scouting for a table at lunchtime.

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